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WinLIRC generated raw codes to pronto discrete format

 
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astra



Joined: 22 May 2008
Posts: 2

PostPosted: Thu May 22, 2008 4:19 am    Post subject: WinLIRC generated raw codes to pronto discrete format Reply with quote

Hi All,

Was wondering if anyone knew how to convert WinLIRC generated raw codes to Pronto Discrete to use on the Psiloc website to gain an .ir file to run on my nokia N95.

I have built myself a simple serial infrared receiver as posted on the web and use it with winlirc to gain the signal codes of my remotes which i cannot find in their data base.

When inserting these codes on psiloc website as it says that its not in pronto discrete format. I would be appreciative if someone could point me in the right direction as to how to convert or if there is a programme or converter that I may use to do it.

please note I am not a programmer or have any knowledge of codes Very Happy

The generated output file written by Winlirc looks like this - I used my Omni DVD remote.

#
# contributed by
#
# brand: Omni
# model:
# supported devices:
#

begin remote

name omni
flags RAW_CODES
eps 80
aeps 100

ptrail 1997
repeat 9336 1983
gap 38426


begin raw_codes

name power
9103 1985 2000 1996 1993 1998
1992 2000 1996 2009 1993 1992
2005 1989 2004 1998 1992 2003
1993 1999 1996 2002 1997 1997
1998 2000 1997 1997 1999 2004
1992

name enter
9211 1989 2005 1984 2009 1991
2005 1987 2004 1999 2010 1987
1988 2004 1995 2000 2003 1991
1996 1997 1997 1996 1999 2005
1992 1993 2000 2000 1994 1998
1994

name play
8972 1987 2001 1993 2004 1993
1993 2001 1997 1996 1996 2008
2054 1942 1999 1993 1994 2001
1995 2001 1990 2003 2003 1990
1998 1996 1998 1997 1999 2010
1985

name stop
9212 1998 2007 1978 2006 1992
1997 1998 2001 1992 1996 2003
1995 2001 1997 1996 2000 1992
2001 1996 2000 1996 2000 1996
2001 1993 1997 2006 1989 2005
1994

name pause
9572 1999 1994 1995 1996 1998
1998 1997 1998 2004 1999 1996
1990 2002 1995 1995 2004 1993
2000 1995 2005 2004 1985 2003
1994 2001 1996 1997 1999 1997
2001

name mute
9473 1998 1989 1998 1998 1998
1992 2007 2040 1952 1995 2000
1994 2006 1996 1992 2001 1995
1998 1999 1997 1993 2000 1999
1996 2000 1994 2000 1995 1998
1998

name forward
9349 1995 1996 1995 1993 2004
1997 1989 2002 2002 2000 1993
1997 1999 1995 1995 2002 1997
1999 1996 2004 1988 2001 1994
1997 2002 1997 1998 1994 2034
1969

name back chapter
9086 1997 1993 2000 1993 2009
1983 2004 1995 2000 1996 2001
1994 1999 2002 1991 2006 1996
1996 1997 2000 1993 2008 1991
2000 2011 1987 1993 1998 1995
1999

name forward chapter
9099 2111 1996 1998 1996 2008
1986 2001 1994 2012 1989 1996
1997 1994 2006 1991 2005 1991
2000 1995 2005 1992 1997 2001
1998 1999 1997 2001 1996 1998
2001

name rewind
9479 2241 1995 2002 1989 1999
2031 1968 1994 1997 1998 1999
1997 1997 2008 1983 2008 1989
2007 1988 2014 1982 1999 2001
1996 1998 2000 1996 1995 2001
1999

name setup
9596 2243 1992 1997 2002 1996
1996 1997 2000 1999 1998 1997
1999 1994 2002 1992 2000 1999
1993 2001 1999 1996 1995 2004
1994 1997 1995 2009 1989 1998
1996

name left
9354 2236 1995 1995 2004 1990
1995 2000 1997 2001 1996 1998
1999 2012 1985 1993 2002 1994
2000 1999 2002 1990 2002 2004
1990 1997 1998 2002 1992 1999
2001

name right
9093 2002 1986 2006 1999 1990
2003 1990 2007 1989 2004 1992
2005 1992 2002 1994 2001 1992
2000 2002 1997 1996 1999 2001
1995 1999 1993 2006 1989 2001
1998

name up
9100 1995 1992 2001 1993 2005
1987 1999 1994 2002 1996 2008
1989 1996 1999 1996 1998 2000
1991 2010 1991 2007 1990 2000
1994 2003 1996 2001 1992 2001
1994

name down
9473 2002 1986 1995 2000 1997
1997 1997 1998 2001 1992 2013
1990 1987 2008 1984 2000 1994
2003 1996 2001 2003 2000 1988
2005 1989 1998 1997 1999 2003
1993

name menu
9220 1986 1999 1993 1999 1995
2006 1989 1996 2007 1989 2003
1991 1997 1999 1996 2004 1991
2002 1993 2008 1988 2000 2001
1996 1998 1999 1995 1999 1997
1998

name 1
8975 1988 1992 2040 1959 2004
1991 1990 2003 1996 2001 1997
2002 1994 1994 2003 1992 2002
2001 1994 1997 2003 1993 2001
1995 1998 2004 1991 2004 1994
2005

name 2
9607 2103 1998 1998 2001 1993
1994 1994 2002 2004 1995 1992
1997 1999 2004 1994 1996 1999
1995 2000 1993 2001 1998 1996
2000 1994 2000 1994 2003 1991
2000

name 3
9350 1991 1995 1992 2003 1997
1997 2000 1999 1992 2006 1993
1996 1999 1993 2003 1995 1998
2000 2000 1996 1996 1997 1997
1999 1997 1998 1996 2008 1992
1995

name 5
9469 1990 1997 2004 1990 1996
2002 1996 1993 2003 1993 2002
1991 2002 1995 2006 1993 1999
1996 1997 1996 1999 1998 1998
1994 1999 2001 1994 2002 1995
2000

name 6
9476 2013 2017 1961 1991 1997
2001 1999 1992 2000 1999 2007
1990 1995 1997 2008 1988 2010
1988 1999 1999 1995 1994 2003
1993 1999 2001 1998 1997 1999
1995

name 8
9218 1995 1991 1994 2008 1990
2002 1993 2000 1998 1999 1993
2003 1993 1997 2001 1992 2003
1993 2002 1994 2003 1995 2003
1994 2000 1994 2006 1994 2002
1994

name 8
9224 1990 1991 2006 1983 2006
1994 1997 1996 2019 1981 1991
2005 2016 1977 1994 2016 1982
1997 2000 1993 2003 1995 2001
1994 1999 1997 1997 1999 1995
2008

name 9
9096 1996 1987 2004 1999 1999
1992 2001 1996 1995 1996 1998
1998 1993 2000 1997 2000 1996
2000 1998 2001 2007 1992 1993
2000 1998 1998 1995 2002 1997
1996

name 0
9219 1994 1995 1997 1996 1996
1995 2012 1982 2001 1998 1996
1997 1998 1999 1995 1998 1995
2013 1983 2000 1998 1995 1997
1998 2002 1999 1995 1994 2003
1996

end raw_codes

end remote
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johnsfine
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Joined: 10 Aug 2003
Posts: 4766
Location: Bedford, MA

PostPosted: Thu May 22, 2008 7:03 am    Post subject: Re: WinLIRC generated raw codes to pronto discrete format Reply with quote

astra wrote:
Was wondering if anyone knew how to convert WinLIRC generated raw codes to Pronto


I usually can interpret LIRC data. I don't recall how "raw" is different from ordinary LIRC data, but if there were meaningful content, I think I could figure it out.

I'm pretty sure there is no meaningful content in the LIRC data you posted. I don't know why you got no meaningful content. Maybe it is an issue in the way you used the LIRC software. Maybe it is something wrong with the hardware you built. Maybe "raw" isn't as meaningful as I would expect.

One significant possibility is the modulation frequency. What IR receive device did you use (the main component of the ir receiver you built)? Most such devices work at a specific modulation frequency. An IR protocol may have a modulation frequency, or may be unmodulated. If you sent an unmodulated IR signal to a modulated IR receiver or if the two frequencies were too far apart, that could explain the meaningless captured data you seen to have gotten.

You might want to try some different original remotes in order to see whether your ir receive hardware and software can give meaningful output for some other signals.

Quote:
I have built myself a simple serial infrared receiver as posted on the web and use it with winlirc to gain the signal codes of my remotes which i cannot find in their data base.


You might want to look at the hardware and software of CaptureIR (in other threads in this forum). In case the problem is in WinLIRC, you could change your hardware (CaptureIR uses the same components as a WinLIRC IR receiver but connected to the PC differently) and try CaptureIR and see if it gives better results.

Quote:
When inserting these codes on psiloc website as it says that its not in pronto discrete format.


LIRC does not generate any Pronto codes. It is fairly difficult for someone who isn't an IR expert to translate from meaningful LIRC data to Pronto Hex. I don't know of any program for doing so. You have the extra problem that your LIRC data doesn't seem to be correct.
Code:

          name power
             9103    1985    2000    1996    1993    1998
             1992    2000    1996    2009    1993    1992
             2005    1989    2004    1998    1992    2003
             1993    1999    1996    2002    1997    1997
             1998    2000    1997    1997    1999    2004
             1992


I'm pretty sure those numbers represent durations. In IR signals, all durations are very approximate, so all those numbers ranging 1985 to 2009 would all represent the same duration. The information content is in the variation of the durations after ignoring the minor variation. But in your data the only non minor variation is that the first one is much bigger than the next thirty. That isn't enough variation to encode anything, so something important was lost in the capture process.

What model Omni do you have? There is a JP1 file for an OMNI SPL-3000G DVD player at
http://www.hifi-remote.com/forums/dload.php?action=file&file_id=611
That uses NEC1 protocol, device 114.205
You could use MakeHex to generate Pronto Hex for all 256 different signal of NEC1 114.205, then use either the KM spreadsheet or the RemoteMaster Java program to read that JP1 file and find out which named function in the JP1 file corresponds to which numbered function in the MakeHex output.

Edit: I get garbage from KM in the OBC column when I try to look at that file. Maybe one of the other experts will check, and tell me whether that file is triggering some KM bug or whether I just have a problem in my copy of KM. But meanwhile, if you think that is a compatible model, we can also get those OBC numbers elsewhere based on the claim that they mostly match setup code DVD/0698.
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astra



Joined: 22 May 2008
Posts: 2

PostPosted: Thu May 22, 2008 7:58 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanking you for your reply & input johnsfine

I acknowledge your expertise in this areas and understand that the data I posted may not have been meaningful or useful in any way.

I have WinLIRC installed on 2 computers, one running xp and the other vista and am getting the same result. perhaps it is my hardware. The ir receiver I am using is the TSOP 1738 and the receiver I have built is a replica of the one posted on this site http://lnx.manoweb.com/lirc/?partType=section&partName=insideBox (sorry if I am not allowed to post links) When using WinLIRC and selecting read raw data it gives a response telling me that the receiver is recieving and working correctly, and as per site to start learning mode, but who knows?

I have looked at CaptureIr and have it installed on my computer, upon reading help files I notice that I would have to change my setup of my receiver from the serial com port to a printer port connection.

I think I will make the relevant changes to my setup and see how my luck goes with CaptureIr. May I ask when using the program (captureIr), what format does it write the resulting code? could this data be used to convert to pronto Discrete format? Is it .ccf? or some other hex format? what program would I use to convert it to Pronto Discrete code that is compatible with the Psiloc site?

The model Omni I have is a DV3300FA, I also have a TEAC TV CT-M807SV not listed anywhere. I will try using CaptureIr before trying to convert JP1 file, seems a little over my head to convert manually.
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kupakai



Joined: 29 Sep 2006
Posts: 283
Location: New York

PostPosted: Thu May 22, 2008 8:01 am    Post subject: Re: WinLIRC generated raw codes to pronto discrete format Reply with quote

johnsfine wrote:
Edit: I get garbage from KM in the OBC column when I try to look at that file. Maybe one of the other experts will check, and tell me whether that file is triggering some KM bug or whether I just have a problem in my copy of KM. But meanwhile, if you think that is a compatible model, we can also get those OBC numbers elsewhere based on the claim that they mostly match setup code DVD/0698.


It seems the function codes were entered in hex format and if you press the "EFC 5" button in the "Functions" tab it will convert the OBC correctly. RM seems to convert it correctly when you load the file. It pretty much matches the DVD/0698 setup code.
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johnsfine
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Joined: 10 Aug 2003
Posts: 4766
Location: Bedford, MA

PostPosted: Thu May 22, 2008 8:33 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

astra wrote:
I have WinLIRC installed on 2 computers, one running xp and the other vista and am getting the same result.


I've never used LIRC myself (just looked at a lot of LIRC results that others posted), so I don't know what choices it gives. Maybe "raw" is flawed. Can you get it to capture some other way?

Quote:
perhaps it is my hardware. The ir receiver I am using is the TSOP 1738 and the receiver I have built is a replica of the one posted on this site


The TSOP1738 is a very good choice. If the protocol is NEC1 (like that other OMNI model and like most DVD players of most brands) then the frequency is correct.

I can't think of a how a hardware problem could give those results. If the protocol is NEC1, then the first duration of about 9000 is correct, but then the rest are wrong. That's hard to explain as a hardware problem.

Quote:
When using WinLIRC and selecting read raw data it gives a response telling me that the receiver is recieving and working correctly, and as per site to start learning mode,


If the second number in your posted data is correct, that would mean you pressed the button on the original remote before the LIRC software was really ready to start receiving, then kept it pressed as the LIRC software finally started receiving. But even that wouldn't explain the rest of the bad data.

Quote:
I notice that I would have to change my setup of my receiver from the serial com port to a printer port connection.


Right. I'd try guessing the data is correct from that JP1 file and try using LIRC some other way before trying CaptureIR.

Quote:
(captureIr), what format does it write the resulting code? could this data be used to convert to pronto Discrete format?


The option to store CaptureIR output in a file is not very useful. The useful output is on screen while running the program. If it works, it would tell you the info you would need to use MakeHex to generate the Pronto Hex that you need. For example, if your model matched the IR signals in that JP1 file, it would tell you that each signal is NEC1 device 114.205 and it would tell you the OBC number of each function.
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johnsfine
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Joined: 10 Aug 2003
Posts: 4766
Location: Bedford, MA

PostPosted: Fri May 23, 2008 2:42 pm    Post subject: Re: WinLIRC generated raw codes to pronto discrete format Reply with quote

astra wrote:
how to convert WinLIRC generated raw codes to Pronto Discrete to use on the Psiloc website to gain an .ir file


Some of this discussion occurred via email (so this post is needed to bring any other interested parties up to date). If I understand correctly, we are now a bit confused about what Psiloc calls "Pronto Discrete" because using common Pronto Hex failed.

Second, the .ir file format used by Psiloc is almost identical to LIRC format. So the originally requested translation from LIRC to Pronto so it could be retranslated to .ir looks a bit excessive at this point.

However, we still have the issue that the actual LIRC data posted in this thread is garbage. We haven't diagnosed why. So even though translating from LIRC to .ir should be trivial, that requires starting with correct LIRC data.

Meanwhile, I emailed instructions for editing a pre existing LIRC or .ir file for a different NEC1 code set to change the predata and the data to match DVD/0698
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csk007



Joined: 06 Jun 2008
Posts: 2

PostPosted: Fri Jun 06, 2008 1:07 am    Post subject: hi Reply with quote

just for the sake of additional info
psiloc accepts this code i found on google

0000 0048 0001 0011 0017 0163 0017 0061 0017 00a3 0017 00a3 0017 0061 0017 0061 0017 0061 0017 00a3 0017 00a3 0017 00a3 0017 00a3 0017 00a3 0017 00a3 0017 00a3 0017 00a3 0017 00a3 0017 00a3 0017 0163

put this code in the composing windowof psiloc select button and press append it accepts it

try appending 0000 to make a total of 40 values (4hexdigits each)
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csk007



Joined: 06 Jun 2008
Posts: 2

PostPosted: Fri Jun 06, 2008 1:29 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

and the matter of converting winlirc generated .cf files into .ir format is very easy
follow the instructions given on psiloc website >>upload wizard

it recognises the .cf after upload
rearrange the buttons in a proper order
thats all now either download the generated .ir file from their website to install on phone manually or use gprs on phone and refresh the lists to get the device u uploaded
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jumpjack



Joined: 09 Jun 2008
Posts: 12

PostPosted: Mon Jun 09, 2008 2:44 am    Post subject: Re: WinLIRC generated raw codes to pronto discrete format Reply with quote

johnsfine wrote:


LIRC does not generate any Pronto codes. It is fairly difficult for someone who isn't an IR expert to translate from meaningful LIRC data to Pronto Hex. I don't know of any program for doing so. You have the extra problem that your LIRC data doesn't seem to be correct.
Code:

          name power
             9103    1985    2000    1996    1993    1998
             1992    2000    1996    2009    1993    1992
             2005    1989    2004    1998    1992    2003
             1993    1999    1996    2002    1997    1997
             1998    2000    1997    1997    1999    2004
             1992


I'm pretty sure those numbers represent durations. In IR signals, all durations are very approximate, so all those numbers ranging 1985 to 2009 would all represent the same duration. The information content is in the variation of the durations after ignoring the minor variation. But in your data the only non minor variation is that the first one is much bigger than the next thirty. That isn't enough variation to encode anything, so something important was lost in the capture process.


This raw code is correct. It just means:
9103 microseconds on
1985 seconds off
2000 on
1996 off
1993 on
1998 off
...
...
Wink

And I really would like to know how to convert Pronto raw (hex) format to LIRC raw format...
I have some pronto codes I need, but I do not have a Pronto remote, neither I have a CCF file... so how do I use these codes?!?


These are the codes I need to convert:

Code:
DVD ON

0000 006d 0022 0003 00ab 00aa 0016 003f 0016 0014 0016 003e 0016 003f 0016 0014 0016 003e 0016 0014 0016 0014 0016 003e 0016 0014 0016 003e 0016 003f 0016 0014 0016 003e 0016 0014 0016 0014 0016 003e 0016 0014 0016 003f 0016 0014 0016 003e 0016 003e 0016 003f 0016 0014 0016 0014 0016 003f 0016 0014 0016 003e 0016 0014 0016 0014 0016 0014 0016 003e 0016 06c3 00ab 00aa 0016 0014 0016 0e7d

DVD OFF

0000 006d 0022 0003 00ab 00aa 0016 003e 0016 0014 0016 003f 0016 003e 0016 0014 0016 003e 0016 0014 0016 0014 0016 003e 0016 0014 0016 003f 0016 003e 0016 0014 0016 003f 0016 0014 0016 0014 0016 0014 0016 003e 0016 003f 0016 0014 0016 003e 0016 003f 0016 003e 0016 0014 0016 003f 0016 0014 0016 0014 0016 003e 0016 0014 0016 0014 0016 0014 0016 003e 0016 06c3 00ab 00aa 0016 0014 0016 0e7d


Link to Pronto file format:
http://www.remotecentral.com/features/irdisp3.htm
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johnsfine
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Joined: 10 Aug 2003
Posts: 4766
Location: Bedford, MA

PostPosted: Mon Jun 09, 2008 8:29 am    Post subject: Re: WinLIRC generated raw codes to pronto discrete format Reply with quote

jumpjack wrote:

This raw code is correct.


Trust me. That raw code is not correct.

Quote:
It just means:
9103 microseconds on
1985 seconds off
2000 on
1996 off
1993 on
1998 off


I was fairly sure (not 100%) that it meant that. The problem is the values after the first are wrong.

Quote:
And I really would like to know how to convert Pronto raw (hex) format to LIRC raw format...


I don't know of a program for doing that. Doing so by hand would be simple, but very slow.

Do you really need LIRC raw format? Can't you use the more common LIRC format?

Translating to the more common LIRC format would be less work, but you don't really need to even do that work:

Quote:
I have some pronto codes I need, but I do not have a Pronto remote, neither I have a CCF file... so how do I use these codes?!?


That is a very common code set (For LG, Zenith and sometimes other brands of DVD). There are plenty of LIRC files posted online for that code set (ordinary format, not raw). If you can use those, I'll take a look and identify some of those online files for you.

Edit: I took a quick look anyway. I found this file:
http://lirc.sourceforge.net/remotes/lg/MKJ32022805
The DVD section at the top of that file is the same basic code set. It doesn't have the two discrete codes you requested, but they would be trivial to add:

See where it says power is 0x0CF3

On similar lines, you could add your two discretes with codes 0xAE51 and 0x6E91

What are you using the LIRC file for? Why did you want raw mode (for most purposes it is less effective)?
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jumpjack



Joined: 09 Jun 2008
Posts: 12

PostPosted: Mon Jun 09, 2008 12:12 pm    Post subject: Re: WinLIRC generated raw codes to pronto discrete format Reply with quote

johnsfine wrote:

What are you using the LIRC file for? Why did you want raw mode (for most purposes it is less effective)?

I just figured out how to turn my cellphone into a remote control just by connecting an IR led to its headset port. Cool
I have just to play a properly formatted WAV file, and this will result in the LED emitting an IR signal which is able to control my devices.

It was only a theory based on several sources I found around... but yesterday it became truth: I successfully controlled a Synudyne TV, an LG DVD recorder, a Funai Video Tape Recorder and a SKY Satellite receiver, just using a led properly connected to a nokia 6680!

The "properly formatted" WAV file is just a 38 KHz tone "silenced" in proper places as to reproduce the remote control signal: at the beginning I created it by hand, exactly silencing a tone using Audacity program; now I found out how to create it from scratch using SOX program to create pieces of carrier&silence and using SHNTOOL to join them and convert them into a final WAV file.

I'm currently working to a tutorial which explains all of this stuff. In the meantime you could take a look to the tutorial to turn the PC (rather than the phone) into a remote sampler/cloner:
http://jumpjack.wordpress.com/2008/05/20/worlds-cheapest-remote-control-replicator-just-1/


In the meantime I found in LIRC mailing list a python program which can convert Pronto RAW format to LIRC raw format:
http://www.nabble.com/New-tool-for-converting-pronto-hex-codes-to-lircd.conf-td17161702.html#a17734790

I'm currently trying to port it to RapidQ basic, which can produce standalone executables for both windows and linux.


Finally, all of this stuff is needed to setup an ambitious project:
being able to program my DVD recorder from remote (VERY remote), sending an SMS to a phone which, at home, sends proper commands to SKY receiver and DVD recorder. Cool

Last information I needed was the discrete on/off code for the DVD.
Now I have all pieces.
Just a matter of putting all of them together and writing proper software! Wink


Thanks for your help.


P.S.
The schematic to turn nokia 6680 into a remote control:

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