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Help with big eeprom

 
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Ellen



Joined: 03 Aug 2003
Posts: 100
Location: East of the Rock, West of the Hard Place

PostPosted: Wed May 26, 2004 9:01 pm    Post subject: Help with big eeprom Reply with quote

Not long ago, I bought a modded 6011 from Rob (great service btw, thanks!). While the remote has some shortcomings, I do find that I like the feel of it in my hand (nice size for a chic with small hands, good weight, channel buttons easy to reach) and decided to give it to my sister and get another. You'd think I'd take the easy route and just order another one from Rob. But where is the fun in that? Very Happy

I poked thru my electronics parts box and found that some time last year I must have thought of getting one of these remotes because there was a little silver pouch from Mouser with two eeprom chips. Cool, I thought, I don't need to order one. So I found a 6011 at the local electronics chain store and decided to get down to business.

So, I break out the soldering iron, solder in a jumper across the JMP2 pads. Get out the magnifying glass and solder in the eeprom. Check the legs with the trusty DMM to make sure I didn't have any shorts. Solder in the 6 pin header. Snap the remote back together, put in some batteries and head to the PC.

I run testEEPROM.exe and get the following results:

Code:
Base port = 0x378  /  IO timer = 600
Writing initial pattern to eeprom[0000...100F]
Read back from eeprom[000...00F]
Overlap from $1000, so eeprom size must be 4K
Reading 002..FFD
2K style read of 00A..019 = 12 C3 0C 81 1A C3 0C C1 1A C3 0C 01 22 C3 0C 41
Match found at 0C15
Press Enter to close


Okay, great, no error messages.

But here is where things get a little sticky. Maybe I bought the wrong eeprom, because when I check the files in big6012eeprom.zip, I don't see any that seem to match these results. I think that I need to use the info from the testEEPROM output to modify one of the 4K txt files from the big eeprom package, but I don't know enough about how this stuff works to figure out where or how to modify the file. After looking at a couple of the other txt files, and doing some file compares, I'm guessing that I'd need to do something at the 0C15 spot in the txt file. But that's a SWAG.

Can any of you experts lend a hand?
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johnsfine
Site Admin


Joined: 10 Aug 2003
Posts: 4766
Location: Bedford, MA

PostPosted: Thu May 27, 2004 6:04 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'll try to get to that later today. If I remember correctly, a 0C15 boundary in a 4K eeprom would require slightly more change to those files than normal, because that cuts short the relocated KeyMove area. You'll get around 8 times the standard KeyMove capacity instead of around 12 times. But I'm sure that will be plenty.
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Ellen



Joined: 03 Aug 2003
Posts: 100
Location: East of the Rock, West of the Hard Place

PostPosted: Thu May 27, 2004 9:12 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks John. Do you think this will require a modified RDF too? Are there any docs around that explain what the various address spaces in the IR text files are? Not that I'd necessarily understand them, but I'd be curious to take a look.

Also just out of curiosity, where does the boundary address come from? Is that something hardwired in the chip, and which could/would/does vary from one chip maker to another?
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The Robman
Site Owner


Joined: 01 Aug 2003
Posts: 19463
Location: Chicago, IL

PostPosted: Thu May 27, 2004 9:57 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Ellen wrote:
Also just out of curiosity, where does the boundary address come from? Is that something hardwired in the chip, and which could/would/does vary from one chip maker to another?

Yes. Because the large EEPROM support in the URC-8811 series of remotes is buggy, the data ends up in the wrong place, and the address of where it does end up varies based on the brand of the chip used. John's extender compensates for this and makes the data useable.
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Rob
www.hifi-remote.com
Please don't PM me with remote questions, post them in the forums so all the experts can help!
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johnsfine
Site Admin


Joined: 10 Aug 2003
Posts: 4766
Location: Bedford, MA

PostPosted: Thu May 27, 2004 10:27 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

The Robman wrote:

Yes. Because the large EEPROM support in the URC-8811 series of remotes is buggy, the data ends up in the wrong place, and the address of where it does end up varies based on the brand of the chip used.


That's a little bit of an understatement. At one very important step (in trying to read something from the eeprom), the URC-8811 sends something to the eeprom in place of an address that isn't an address at all. Various models of eeprom interpret that non address differently. But fortunately a given model of eeprom interprets it consistently (same way every time it happens).

As a result the remote reads some very important data from the eeprom at the wrong address.

We test to determine the wrong address, then reconfigure both the extender and the RDF so that IR.exe will store the data the remote will read at that "wrong" address rather than where it would correctly belong. So the 8811 ends up reading exactly the data it intended to read, even though there is a bug in its method of sending the address to the eeprom. For all other eeprom reads (KeyMoves, Upgrades, etc.) it sends the address correctly, so only one critical block of data needs to be put in the "wrong" place by IR.EXE.

The remote also has the ability (when the extender is not activated) to write that block of data back to the eeprom (If you change a setup code or VPT setting, etc.). But that is done without the bug, so it gets written to the "right" place. But it's always read from the "wrong" place. So JP1 is not just more convenient for programming than the built in method. It's totally necessary. It's the only way to update any of the basic settings that are read from the "wrong" place.
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Ellen



Joined: 03 Aug 2003
Posts: 100
Location: East of the Rock, West of the Hard Place

PostPosted: Thu May 27, 2004 11:55 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

wow, the depth and breadth of knowledge you guys have about this stuff is mind boggling! I appreciate the info.
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