JP1 Remotes Forum Index JP1 Remotes


FAQFAQ SearchSearch 7 days of topics7 Days MemberlistMemberlist UsergroupsUsergroups RegisterRegister
ProfileProfile Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages Log inLog in

Off Topic - Home Theater
Goto page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4  Next
 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    JP1 Remotes Forum Index -> Non-JP1
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
greeno



Joined: 07 Jan 2014
Posts: 23

PostPosted: Fri Jun 02, 2017 6:08 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi vicky,
i like these switches
http://www.ebay.com/itm/222527266219

1 hour left, maybe you can get it cheap.

i might have an older 100Mbps 4 port netgear i would give you if you're interested. let me verify i still have it.

it's okay to continue with this account. thanks for the offer.

Best,
jeff
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
vickyg2003
Site Admin


Joined: 20 Mar 2004
Posts: 7002
Location: Florida

PostPosted: Sat Jun 03, 2017 5:45 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Things are starting to take shape. I've ordered the $7 cheapy HDMI switch that Rob found. I ordered/received a $7 extra power supply for my Roku, and it makes moving the Roku very easy. HD looks so great when its huge. Will buy a BluRay player before my next RedBox rental.

Jeff,
I don't know what to look for when I buy this stuff. I'm new to networking.

I think this is the same switch.
https://www.amazon.com/dp/B01LYSU4G6/

If I went for 16 port would this be a good one?
https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00023DRLO/
I plan to use the switch with this patch panel.



On a recommendation of this forum I added 3 ethernet ports behind the TVs where I ran coax. One for smart stuff and 2 for HDMI over ethernet. I assume that for the hdmi over ethernet option that it will be a direct wire and not need to go through the switch. I am looking for this option if eventually I need to get boxes for my cable and pay per/TV. My tv/internet bill has doubled since 2008 with no additional services, I'd hate to have to give up TV locations if I started having to pay per TV location. At that time the AV receiver will start to make economic sense.

You might be able to see I have 13 lines so far. Nothing to my bedroom, my son's bedroom and the kitchen. I don't know if I'll ever do the bedrooms, but that kitchen is still on my to-do list.

I wish I had done the whole house, because this isn't going to get any easier as I get older.

So far the only thing I've done with my patch panel, is connect the router from my office directly to my husband's office, which is a wireless dead zone.
_________________
Remember to provide feedback to let us know how the problem was solved and share your upgrades.

Tip: When creating an upgrade, always include ALL functions from the oem remote, even if you never plan on assigning them to a button. Complete function lists makes an upgrade more helpful to others.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
The Robman
Site Owner


Joined: 01 Aug 2003
Posts: 18563
Location: Chicago, IL

PostPosted: Sat Jun 03, 2017 10:17 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

The main thing to look for with switches and routers is the word "gigabit", to make sure they can handle the throughput.

Here's a cheaper 8-port switch for $25:
https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00A121WN6/

and a 16-port for $60:
https://www.amazon.com/dp/B002HAJQGA/
_________________
Rob
www.hifi-remote.com
Please don't PM me with remote questions, post them in the forums so all the experts can help!
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
vickyg2003
Site Admin


Joined: 20 Mar 2004
Posts: 7002
Location: Florida

PostPosted: Sat Jun 03, 2017 3:36 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The Robman wrote:
The main thing to look for with switches and routers is the word "gigabit", to make sure they can handle the throughput.

I thought I was supposed to look for the same brand too. Or is that bad information that I picked up?


Quote:

Here's a cheaper 8-port switch for $25:
https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00A121WN6/

and a 16-port for $60:
https://www.amazon.com/dp/B002HAJQGA/


Hmm, TP is a brand. When I looked for an dual band adapter for my husband's PC, they kept coming up. I tried brands I recognized and then finally ended up with an EdiMAX, because the others D-Link and Netgear didn't get the job done. D-Link had the most horrible user interface, and Netgear didn't work, but that was because I didn't understand all the terms (AC vs N)...

Now I'm looking for Gigabyte.

My router is long in the tooth, and in need of replacement, but I'm wondering if there is some other piece of equipment that is slowing the network to a crawl. It just dawned on me that the last few days before we left FL our router down there was suddenly needing to be rebooted daily. I attributed that to the IP forcing upgrades to the equipment trying to tame the mess they made. They sold the complex wireless TV. We went from 30% saturation to 100% of the units having a wireless router. That meant there were 15 routers per channel when you went to set things up. And Uverse doesn't use normal 1,6,11 they use overlapping channels so 2.4Ghz was unusable. So we went to 5Ghz, and all was good, until the last few days and then the 5Ghz started slowing down and requiring a reboot. Now I'm wondering if it might be one of the other devices that we take to MI for the summer, is causing all this havoc.
_________________
Remember to provide feedback to let us know how the problem was solved and share your upgrades.

Tip: When creating an upgrade, always include ALL functions from the oem remote, even if you never plan on assigning them to a button. Complete function lists makes an upgrade more helpful to others.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
The Robman
Site Owner


Joined: 01 Aug 2003
Posts: 18563
Location: Chicago, IL

PostPosted: Sun Jun 04, 2017 8:07 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I don't think brand matters, apart from choosing a reliable brand, etc. Gigabit refers to the bandwidth being about to support speeds in multitudes of gigabits per second (ie, 1000 mbps and up). If you have an older "fast ethernet" switch in the mix, that could be a bottleneck because they only support 10/100 mbps.

You also want to check the connection standards that a router supports (ie, 802.11n, 802.11ac, etc).
_________________
Rob
www.hifi-remote.com
Please don't PM me with remote questions, post them in the forums so all the experts can help!


Last edited by The Robman on Mon Jun 05, 2017 4:26 pm; edited 1 time in total
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
vickyg2003
Site Admin


Joined: 20 Mar 2004
Posts: 7002
Location: Florida

PostPosted: Sun Jun 04, 2017 11:03 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

The Robman wrote:
I don't think brand matters, apart from choosing a reliable brand, etc.

I needed to reread my comment to understand that you were addressing same brand switch and router. My first thought was I like name brand equipment with quality firmware and support.

Quote:


Gigabit refers to the bandwidth being about to support speeds in multitudes of gigabits per second (ie, 1000k bps and up). If you have an older "fast ethernet" switch in the mix, that could be a bottleneck because they only support 10/100 kbps.


No old switches. If I'd ever bought one before I wouldn't be this uninformed.

Ooh speaking of bottlenecks, I only have one network cable running to the second floor. It used to run from an upstairs bedroom to my husband's office. I used that line to pull the new coax down from the wall and then ran both lines back to my patch panel. Upon inspecting that cable today I see it says CAT V which I assume is CAT 5. If I ever use that cable will it kill my entire network speed? Does this cable need to be replaced?

Quote:

You also want to check the connection standards that a router supports (ie, 802.11n, 802.11ac, etc).


You have no idea how much this forum helps me getting started. I am only interested in this stuff when I'm putting my money down, so I'm always starting way behind the curve when it comes to buying equipment for networking, computing, or AV specs. That's why I take so much time springing into action. I researched TVs vs projectors for 6 months before taking action. And I was all set to buy a screen and got a stack of samples only to find that I didn't like any of them as well as paint!

Just wish I had taken action with my Nevo before EZRC went away, although I have every confidence that graham and the other experts here will figure out a solution. Nobody here takes no for an answer.
_________________
Remember to provide feedback to let us know how the problem was solved and share your upgrades.

Tip: When creating an upgrade, always include ALL functions from the oem remote, even if you never plan on assigning them to a button. Complete function lists makes an upgrade more helpful to others.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
yaworski



Joined: 22 Jun 2014
Posts: 444
Location: Warsaw, Poland

PostPosted: Mon Jun 05, 2017 5:49 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Cat 5 may pose a problem with Gigabit Ethernet. For reliable Gb connection it should be at least Cat 5e (but it's not ideal anyway, Cat 6 or better for Gb is preferable).

This single connection won't affect the rest of your network though. Ethernet switch is fully capable of working with different speeds per each port. If the cable is not enough to support Gb connection then only that port drops to FastEthernet (100 Mbps). So it depends what do you plan to connect on the second floor.

If you need more connections on the second floor, then you can add another switch on that floor (connecting it to this single cable) and then distribute connections from that switch. Devices connected directly to the switch will be able to fully use Gigabit connections between them, but keep in mind that the uplink to your main switch is only a single Gigabit connection (so it must be shared between all second floor devices). Fortunately for most application a Gigabit connection is a lot more that's really needed.

I don't know if this model is being sold in U.S. but I can recommend TP-Link TL-SG108E switch. It's a manageable 8-port, Gigabit desktop switch with a really good price. Just be sure it's SG108E, not SG108. The E at the end means it's manageable. A manageable switch gives you much more control on the traffic: you can define different quality-of-service priorities per port.

As for the performance, after I've added this switch to my network and moved most cables from a switch built into my router, transfers between my Synology NAS and my PC jumped from around 30 MB/s to even 90 MB/s. Keep in mind that this may depend on cables (category and length of the cables) as more errors will cause re-transmission of the packets and lower the throughput. In my flat I'm using Cat 7 cables (it's a little overkill but I've had good access to such cables so it would be a mistake not to use them :)).
_________________
Marcin
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
vickyg2003
Site Admin


Joined: 20 Mar 2004
Posts: 7002
Location: Florida

PostPosted: Mon Jun 05, 2017 11:23 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

yaworski wrote:
Cat 5 may pose a problem with Gigabit Ethernet. For reliable Gb connection it should be at least Cat 5e (but it's not ideal anyway, Cat 6 or better for Gb is preferable).
Well I am using 5e. That ship has sailed. The one cat v cable lioks like it was just dropped down rhe hot air register. So replacing that cable shouldn't be horrible.

Quote:
This single connection won't affect the rest of your network though. Ethernet switch is fully capable of working with different speeds per each port. If the cable is not enough to support Gb connection then only that port drops to FastEthernet (100 Mbps). So it depends what do you plan to connect on the second floor.


Right now just stream video to smart devices.
I am still trying to figure out what the other ethernet runs are for.

Quote:


If you need more connections on the second floor, then you can add another switch on that floor (connecting it to this single cable) and then distribute connections from that switch. Devices connected directly to the switch will be able to fully use Gigabit connections between them, but keep in mind that the uplink to your main switch is only a single Gigabit connection (so it must be shared between all second floor devices). Fortunately for most application a Gigabit connection is a lot more that's really needed



In series with the other switch? I would like to have 2 connections in my husband's office but couldn't get a second line to follw when i was pulling the wires. Id like to put his network printer online. Altough I am not sure if putting that dinosaur (HP Laserjet 4plus) on line would be bad for my network. That beast just keeps on going!!

Quote:
I don't know if this model is being sold in U.S. but I can recommend TP-Link TL-SG108E switch. It's a manageable 8-port, Gigabit desktop switch with a really good price. Just be sure it's SG108E, not SG108. The E at the end means it's manageable. A manageable switch gives you much more control on the traffic: you can define different quality-of-service priorities per port.



What does manageable mean? Is that a lot more complicated?
_________________
Remember to provide feedback to let us know how the problem was solved and share your upgrades.

Tip: When creating an upgrade, always include ALL functions from the oem remote, even if you never plan on assigning them to a button. Complete function lists makes an upgrade more helpful to others.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
yaworski



Joined: 22 Jun 2014
Posts: 444
Location: Warsaw, Poland

PostPosted: Mon Jun 05, 2017 12:20 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

vickyg2003 wrote:
yaworski wrote:
Cat 5 may pose a problem with Gigabit Ethernet. For reliable Gb connection it should be at least Cat 5e (but it's not ideal anyway, Cat 6 or better for Gb is preferable).
Well I am using 5e. That ship has sailed. The one cat v cable lioks like it was just dropped down rhe hot air register. So replacing that cable shouldn't be horrible.


I would replace it if you need this connection to reliably work at Gigabit speeds.

vickyg2003 wrote:

Quote:
This single connection won't affect the rest of your network though. Ethernet switch is fully capable of working with different speeds per each port. If the cable is not enough to support Gb connection then only that port drops to FastEthernet (100 Mbps). So it depends what do you plan to connect on the second floor.


Right now just stream video to smart devices.
I am still trying to figure out what the other ethernet runs are for.

Quote:


If you need more connections on the second floor, then you can add another switch on that floor (connecting it to this single cable) and then distribute connections from that switch. Devices connected directly to the switch will be able to fully use Gigabit connections between them, but keep in mind that the uplink to your main switch is only a single Gigabit connection (so it must be shared between all second floor devices). Fortunately for most application a Gigabit connection is a lot more that's really needed



In series with the other switch? I would like to have 2 connections in my husband's office but couldn't get a second line to follw when i was pulling the wires. Id like to put his network printer online. Altough I am not sure if putting that dinosaur (HP Laserjet 4plus) on line would be bad for my network. That beast just keeps on going!!


Yes, it will be in series. Network switches are active devices so they can be chained together for long runs (you can compare them to signal repeaters). Each switch in series add just a little latency but for home usage it's not something you need to worry about (it's a fraction of a millisecond). Just plug that single cable going to second floor to into second switch and then you can connect devices on that floor to that switch. The port you use doesn't matter. Also with Gigabit switches you don't need to worry about crossing the cable (by crossing I mean switching green/white-green wires with orange/white-orange ones on one end; it's something that had to be done with FastEthernet when connecting PC-PC or Switch-Switch directly as opposed to PC-Switch).

vickyg2003 wrote:

Quote:
I don't know if this model is being sold in U.S. but I can recommend TP-Link TL-SG108E switch. It's a manageable 8-port, Gigabit desktop switch with a really good price. Just be sure it's SG108E, not SG108. The E at the end means it's manageable. A manageable switch gives you much more control on the traffic: you can define different quality-of-service priorities per port.



What does manageable mean? Is that a lot more complicated?


There are two basic types of switches:
- Unmanaged switches - these are simplest switches which don't have any administrative interface (no IP address, no web panel, no console interface etc). All it can do is to switch the packets to correct output ports to deliver them to destination devices.
- Managed switches - these are more advanced ones, they usually have some kind of administrative interface. For example, the one I've recommended has its own IP address on the local network and a web interface for administration (like a router web interface). Without any extra configuration it works just like the non-manageable switch, but you can also do some extra optimisation of your network.

For example, if you add a second switch, then you can change switching priority on each of them on the ports connecting both switches, to have a priority before any other ports. That way you can maximise throughput between the switches no matter what data is being transferred between other devices.

Of course it's not everything a managed switch can do. You can set up network access authorisation (requires some extra components), you can use VLAN (virtual LAN) to have more than one network on the same equipment (as an example you can use a VLAN for IP Cameras to be on a separate subnet than entertainment devices for security reasons).
_________________
Marcin
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
greeno



Joined: 07 Jan 2014
Posts: 23

PostPosted: Mon Jun 05, 2017 12:53 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

@yaworski has given you some good advice, and background.

I went through and replaced some ancient cat 5 cables that were limiting my speeds to < 100Mbps when they should have been 200Mbps. i replaced with cat 5e.

yes avoid chaining if you can, but sometimes you can't avoid it. i aggregate 4 devices in the AV rack with a 4 port switch that then is connected to an 8port switch (one of two) in the main equipment closet, then on to the router. I never see that latency, but I'm sure it's there.

the managed switches are cool as you can log into them and configure them. I've not needed that capability, but many need them as their ISP's use "tagged" traffic for TV or people need it for VOIP.

Best,
jeff
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
yaworski



Joined: 22 Jun 2014
Posts: 444
Location: Warsaw, Poland

PostPosted: Mon Jun 05, 2017 1:24 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

@greeno, it's just sub-millisecond delay per switch. For home applications it's not something you need to worry about. It's rather the uplink capacity that you need to take into account. If you only have a single Gigabit uplink to the next switch and you have 4 other Gigabit capable devices on it, then it's obvious that all of them won't be able to achieve full speed at the same time. The uplink is going to be shared.

Managed switches usually have one more nice feature called link bonding. This feature allows group together 2 or more ports and use them together as the uplink to another switch for example (of course with the same number of cables). So by bonding two Gigabit links between two switches you can have 2Gbps throughput between them.
_________________
Marcin
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
vickyg2003
Site Admin


Joined: 20 Mar 2004
Posts: 7002
Location: Florida

PostPosted: Thu Jun 08, 2017 12:36 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

ohh my, I didn't see these last two posts. More reading...

I'm getting a new gigabit router. My router has been acting up so no opposition from the DH. It gradually slows down from a 30Mbs download to 2 Mbs, every 12 hours. Although it did behave for 2 days this week.

I'm considering these three routers. They all have a USB 3.0 and 2.0 port, 4 ethernet ports, Dual Band, Gigabit speed. I'm thinking that all of these have the features you all have mentioned.


    Linksys AC1900 Dual Band Wireless Router, Works with Amazon Alexa (Max Stream EA7500)
    1.4GhZ Dual-core Qualicom processor

    NETGEAR Nighthawk AC1900 Dual Band Wi-Fi Gigabit Router (R7000) 1- USB 3.0 & USB 2.0 slots
    1.GHz processor Mu-Mimo

    TP-Link AC2600 Wireless Wi-Fi Gigabit Router with 4-Stream Technology (Archer C2600) 1.4GHz processor, Qualcomm's 802.11ac MU-EFX chipset


On paper the TP-Link is cheaper and has better specs, but what worries me is the Amazon reviews talking about having to run ancient firmware, because the new versions drops connections all the time.

Am I missing out on any other features that would be useful in home entertainment? This is all about streaming video from the internet and from my local network. I haven't done any local streaming todate but I want to learn how.

I'm interested in network storage in the context of accessing my media from other devices on my network. I am finally starting to see the benefits. I don't want to be a ludite!

I've looked at a blu-ray disk I might want to own, and it says it comes with a "digital copy". Is that something you can put on network storage to run across your network?


greeno, could you explain more about video taggging by ISPs.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
vickyg2003
Site Admin


Joined: 20 Mar 2004
Posts: 7002
Location: Florida

PostPosted: Sun Jun 11, 2017 11:59 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Still in the networking planning stage. DH is in a very accommodating mood, so I want to make the most of this and not underbuy. He's been a real good sport about the whole theater thing. I worked on him for over 6 months to get him to come around to a big screen TV and then blind sided him with the projector. but it turned out so well that he can't complain. He's even ventured down to the basement for "special events".

I've been looking at a WD 4TB My Cloud NAS for my DVD collection (and of course I'd need a second one for backup.) I've got well over 600 movies. I'm assuming 4GB per movie, 2.4 GB if I transferred them all. or is that figure too low? Do I need more that 4TB?

The interface on the video demo, made this WD NAS demo looke easy to use. This unit is a DNLA server, although I've read that these are not the best way of serving your videos and music up. I want to watch this content on TV's on my local network through my Roku and and other smart devices as I acquire them. I've been reading about PLEX and Kodi servers, but I'm not sure I am mentally up to the challenge. The Roku4 can play H.264/AVC (.MKV, .MP4, .MOV) files from a DLNA server the same way it works from the USB thumb drive. I am not sure what all those letters mean but


I assume the DVD data conversion will be less time intensive than when I transferred all my vinyl and cassettes to CDs. In that case I had to attend the recording, then listen and divde the songs into tracks, and type in all the meta data. Took several months to finish 150 albums.

If I rip and store this stuff, can I do a PLEX or Kodi server at a later date?

So do I need a VPN router?

I don't intend to share my collection with anyone, but not quite sure if converting these for my own private use is legal and wouldn't want the internet police at my doorstep.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
The Robman
Site Owner


Joined: 01 Aug 2003
Posts: 18563
Location: Chicago, IL

PostPosted: Sun Jun 11, 2017 12:19 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

vickyg2003 wrote:
I don't intend to share my collection with anyone, but not quite sure if converting these for my own private use is legal and wouldn't want the internet police at my doorstep.

Ripping data for personal consumption is totally legal under the terms of "fair use".
_________________
Rob
www.hifi-remote.com
Please don't PM me with remote questions, post them in the forums so all the experts can help!
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
pH7_jp1



Joined: 14 Sep 2003
Posts: 456
Location: Sterling Heights, MI

PostPosted: Sun Jun 11, 2017 6:19 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

You don't need a second WD MyCloud for backups. It has USB on the back and when you connect a drive it will be recognized and can be set up for backup purposes. If you ripped you DVD's as an ISO so the menus are operational -- a DLNA server won't serve them.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic       JP1 Remotes Forum Index -> Non-JP1 All times are GMT - 5 Hours
Goto page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4  Next
Page 2 of 4

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum


 

Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2005 phpBB Group
Get Smart! the band's official homepage Rockabilly Central